The Mystery of the Vanishing Screwball
Hector Santiago of the Los Angeles Angels was sitting at a restaurant table in Glendale, Ariz., in March, holding an orange in his left hand. He formed a circle with his thumb and forefinger, then spread his remaining fingers around the fruit with half an inch between each one.
Up Close on Baseball’s Borders
Steve Rushin of Sports Illustrated has called the line running through Connecticut that separates Yankee fans and Red Sox fans the Munson-Nixon line. Mr.
Tony Gwynn’s 2 Hitting Secrets: Work and More Work
Tony Gwynn may have embodied the game of baseball better than anyone else who has played. It was not because Gwynn, who died of cancer on Monday at age 54, was among its greatest hitters. It was because of the wonder he found in the game and the joy he took in applying his daily discoveries.
How Jurgen Klinsmann Plans to Make U.S. Soccer Better (and Less American)
Even before he exiled the most accomplished and iconic player in United States soccer history and before his presumptive top goal scorer went nearly an entire season without scoring goals and before h
The Burden of Being Messi
In much of Argentina, where Lionel Messi lived until he was 13, native speakers replace the “y” sound with a “sh” sound. Yo, the personal pronoun for “I,” becomes “sho,” and calle, which other Spanish speakers would pronounce “ka-yay,” becomes “ka-shey.
Deconstructing the Perfect Burger
How to make a great hamburger is a question that has bedeviled the nation for generations, for as long as Americans have had griddles and broilers, for as long as summertime shorts-wearing cooks have gone into the yard to grill.
How to Make Pizza: A Recipe from Roberta's Pizza
There is pizza dough in my refrigerator right now. I made it last night in about 20 minutes, 15 of which were spent reading a magazine while it rested.
The Master Ice Cream Recipe
1. In a small pot, simmer cream, milk, sugar and salt until sugar completely dissolves, about 5 minutes. Remove pot from heat. In a separate bowl, whisk yolks.
Thanksgiving Recipes Across the United States
Lucy Buffett’s Oyster Dressing 12 tablespoons/1 1/2 sticks unsalted butter, divided, plus more for baking dish 1 (8-inch-square) baked and cooled cornbread, pref
7 Sauces That Taste Better Homemade
Two weeks ago I provided nine nonbeef burger recipes. Consider these recipes an addendum: homemade alternatives to the bottled and jarred condiments that are lined up like summer’s foot soldiers on our refrigerator doors.
What if Age Is Nothing but a Mind-Set?
One day in the fall of 1981, eight men in their 70s stepped out of a van in front of a converted monastery in New Hampshire. They shuffled forward, a few of them arthritically stooped, a couple with canes. Then they passed through the door and entered a time warp.
Learning How to Exert Self-Control
PARIS — NOT many Ivy League professors are associated with a type of candy. But Walter Mischel, a professor of psychology at Columbia, doesn’t mind being one of them. I’m with Mr. Mischel (pronounced me-SHELL) in his tiny home office in Paris, where he spends the summer with his girlfriend.
A Natural Fix for A.D.H.D.
ATTENTION deficit hyperactivity disorder is now the most prevalent psychiatric illness of young people in America, affecting 11 percent of them at some point between the ages of 4 and 17.
Why Teenagers Act Crazy
ADOLESCENCE is practically synonymous in our culture with risk taking, emotional drama and all forms of outlandish behavior. Until very recently, the widely accepted explanation for adolescent angst has been psychological.
A Revolutionary Approach to Treating PTSD
Bessel van der Kolk sat cross-legged on an oversize pillow in the center of a smallish room overlooking the Pacific Ocean in Big Sur. He wore khaki pants, a blue fleece zip-up and square wire-rimmed glasses. His feet were bare.
At Alibaba, the Founder Is Squarely in Charge
At the resplendent China World Hotel in Beijing, scores of cameras snapped as colorful confetti floated down from the ceiling. It was Aug. 11, 2005, and this was the global coming-out party for Alibaba, the Chinese e-commerce upstart.
How One Lawyer’s Crusade Could Change Football Forever
There are 1.27 million lawyers in the United States, one for about every 300 Americans — about 400,000 more of them than there are doctors. Their work is rarely glamorous, and especially for those just starting out in the profession, it can be grinding and repetitive.
N.C.A.A. Fan Map: How the Country Roots for College Football
Visit The Upshot on Facebook Visit The Upshot on Twitter Follow The Upshot via RSS The Upshot More on NYTimes.
Kendrick Lamar, Hip-Hop’s Newest Old-School Star
‘Everybody just wants to have fun, be with the scene,” Kendrick Lamar said when we met in his cramped quarters inside the Barclays Center in Brooklyn last fall. “Certain people get backstage, people that you would never expect. . . .
Sia Furler, the Socially Phobic Pop Star
Sia Furler walked into the Silver Lake studio 10 minutes late, ignoring the 22 keyboards and six guitars and giant speakers on her way to the blue velour sofa in the back.
Streaming Music Has Left Me Adrift
It’s hard to imagine now, but there once was a time when you could not play any song ever recorded, instantly, from your phone. I call this period adolescence. It lasted approximately 30 years, and it was galvanized by conflict.
Chief Defends Spotify After Snub by Taylor Swift
Spotify is the future. Spotify is the enemy. Spotify doesn’t pay enough. Spotify is music’s best bet for revenue growth. Since it arrived in the United States from Sweden in 2011, Spotify has been cast as both hero and villain in the music industry’s continuing debate over streaming music.
No Time to Think
ONE of the biggest complaints in modern society is being overscheduled, overcommitted and overextended. Ask people at a social gathering how they are and the stock answer is “super busy,” “crazy busy” or “insanely busy.” Nobody is just “fine” anymore.
How to Stop Time
IN the unlikely event that we could ever unite under the banner of a single saint, it might just be St. Expeditus.
Discovering Two Screens Aren’t Better Than One
For years, techies have argued that getting an extra monitor or two for your desktop computer is an especially effective way to increase personal productivity. The logic seemed airtight: Two (or more) computer monitors means more room on your virtual desktop, which means more room to do your work.
36 Hours in Copenhagen
The mystique of Copenhagen is multifaceted, but for many, it begins with food. The Danish capital is the standard-bearer for New Nordic cuisine, a movement sustained by a society that encourages homegrown talent, in this case chefs experimenting with local ingredients.
36 Hours in Chicago
Chicago is a city that changes noticeably with the seasons. It is endlessly beautiful in the warm months, when the sidewalks transform into cafes, the Lakefront Trail becomes a Divvy Bike highway and the beaches along Lake Michigan might be mistaken for Miami.
36 Hours in Washington, D.C.
While most Americans associate Capitol Hill with Congressional misadventures and general dysfunction, thousands of people — senators, reporters, congressional aides, artists, working-class long-timers and young families — call it home.
36 Hours in Prague
For people who haven’t traveled to Prague recently, the Czech capital might seem like a known quantity: a city with a thousand years of architecture, cheap beer and often boring restaurants where the most unusual ingredients are the doughy dumplings.
36 Hours in Madrid
In the five years since Spain’s economy took a nose-dive, madrileños never stopped going out, but they did become more judicious in their spending.
36 Hours in Upper Manhattan
In the 18th century, the northern half of Manhattan Island served as a bucolic escape for New Yorkers with the cash to afford it and the horse and carriage to get them there.
36 Hours in Seattle
The sky is often gray, the residents tend to be muted (except when cheering their teams), calm waters lap the green cityscape, but beneath its mild exterior, Seattle has always careened wildly between boom and bust. For better or worse, boom is the mode of the day.
36 Hours in Kyoto, Japan
A full 36 hours, 36 days, or even 36 weeks could be spent exploring the thousands of Buddhist temples, Shinto shrines, Zen gardens, palaces, pagodas, parks and walking paths in Kyoto, the former imperial capital of Japan.
36 Hours on the Beach in Barcelona
So many travel articles extolling the cultural and gastronomic attractions of Barcelona close with something along the lines of “and you have the beach right there.” But that is usually the last you hear about the city’s nearly three-mile stretch of sand and gently lapping waves.
36 Hours in Nashville
Country music is alive and well in Nashville; you might even see a young family in broad daylight practicing their line dancing on the sidewalk outside a bar downtown — all in cowboy boots, including the toddler who just learned to walk.
When Women Become Men at Wellesley
Hundreds of young women streamed into Wellesley College on the last Monday of August, many of them trailed by parents lugging suitcases and bins filled with folded towels, decorative pillows and Costco-size jugs of laundry detergent.
A Link Between Fidgety Boys and a Sputtering Economy
The behavior gap between rich and poor children, starting at very early ages, is now a well-known piece of social science.
Harassment in Science, Replicated
As an undergraduate student in biology, I spent several weeks in Costa Rica one summer with an older graduate student on a research project deep in the cloud forest. It was just the two of us, and upon arriving at our site, I discovered that he had arranged a single room for us, one bed.
Who Is a Feminist Now?
In a recent interview with Time magazine, the actress Shailene Woodley was asked if she considered herself a feminist. “No,” said Ms. Woodley, 22.
Can Jill Soloway Do Justice to the Trans Movement?
In April, Jill Soloway sat on a cushion on the floor of her home office in Silver Lake as she waited for the glue on her fake eyelashes to dry. She was reading through a list of talking points that Glaad, the L.G.B.T.
The Secret Life of Passwords
Howard Lutnick, the chief executive of Cantor Fitzgerald, one of the world’s largest financial-services firms, still cries when he talks about it.
Raising a Moral Child
What does it take to be a good parent? We know some of the tricks for teaching kids to become high achievers. For example, research suggests that when parents praise effort rather than ability, children develop a stronger work ethic and become more motivated.
A Cure for Hyper-Parenting
PARIS — I recently spent the afternoon with some Norwegians who are making a documentary about French child-rearing. Why would people in one of the world’s most successful countries care how anyone else raises kids?
Paternity Leave: The Rewards and the Remaining Stigma
Five months after Todd Bedrick’s daughter was born, he took some time off from his job as an accountant. The company he works for, Ernst & Young, offered paid paternity leave, and he decided to take six weeks — the maximum amount — when his wife, Sarah, went back to teaching.
Steve Jobs Was a Low-Tech Parent
When Steve Jobs was running Apple, he was known to call journalists to either pat them on the back for a recent article or, more often than not, explain how they got it wrong. I was on the receiving end of a few of those calls. But nothing shocked me more than something Mr.
Do Our Kids Get Off Too Easy?
THE conventional wisdom these days is that kids come by everything too easily — stickers, praise, A’s, trophies.
Twine, the Video-Game Technology for All
Perhaps the most surprising thing about “GamerGate,” the culture war that continues to rage within the world of video games, is the game that touched it off.
A Call for a Low-Carb Diet That Embraces Fat
People who avoid carbohydrates and eat more fat, even saturated fat, lose more body fat and have fewer cardiovascular risks than people who follow the low-fat diet that health authorities have favored for decades, a major new study shows.
Always Hungry? Here’s Why
FOR most of the last century, our understanding of the cause of obesity has been based on immutable physical law. Specifically, it’s the first law of thermodynamics, which dictates that energy can neither be created nor destroyed.

Similar results:

O3Spaces
"The way to extend OpenOffice.org O3Spaces is a document management system developed by O3Spaces B.V.. It is built by a team of software engineers based in the Netherlands using OpenOffice.org, StarOffice, and ODF-centric applications as enterprise office and collaboration solutions. The product is written in Java, and based on the Tomcat server with a PostgreSQL backend . O3Spaces works by providing users a single web-based team environment, with built-in search capabilities and an optional Desktop Assistant. Its search functionality is said to work across PDF, ODF, and Microsoft Office document formats. Currently Firefox, Internet Explorer and Safari are supported.
Object-Oriented Reengineering Patterns
Serge Demeyer, Stéphane Ducasse and Oscar Nierstrasz
Oboe.js
makes it really easy to start using json from a response before the ajax request completes; or even if it never completes.
Odoo
Odoo is a suite of open-source business apps written in Python, released under the AGPL license. It is used by 2 million users worldwide to manage companies of all different sizes. The main Odoo components are the server, 260 core modules, around 4000 community modules.
Odoo
Odoo is a suite of open-source business apps written in Python and released under the AGPL license. It is used by 2 million users worldwide Odoo was formerly known as OpenERP until May 2014. It was rebranded because version 8 of the software introduced apps including website builder, e-commerce, point of sale and business intelligence. The software conforms to standard expectations of ERP systems, while providing additional modules beyond the coverage of traditional ERP systems. The official Odoo apps are organized in 6 groups: Front-end apps: website builder, blog, e-commerce Sales management apps: CRM, point of sales, quotation builder Business operations apps: project management, inventory, manufacturing, accounting and purchase Marketing apps: mass mailing, lead automation, events, survey, forum, live chat Human Resources apps: employee directory, enterprise social network, leaves management, timesheet, fleet management Productivity apps: business intelligence, instant messaging, notes The software is actively programmed, supported, and organized by Odoo S.A. Odoo is similar to many open source projects where customized programming, support, and other services are also provided by an active global community and a network of 500 official partners.
Official Google Blog
Insights from Googlers into our products, technology, and the Google culture

1 - 50 of 138