Thirteen Ways of Looking at Greg Maddux
The joke, said Braves broadcaster Skip Caray, is that if half the people who claimed to be at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium during the Bad Times (1985 to 1990) had actually been there, no seat would've been available.
Billy Beane’s Ascendant A’s Are Playing a Brand-New Brand of Moneyball
The funniest thing about the legacy of Moneyball, the 2003 Michael Lewis book and the 2011 Brad Pitt movie, is that it quickly became an ongoing leadership seminar about losers.
The Undefeated Champions of Defeat City
When you leave the baseball fields at Pyne Poynt Park in Camden, New Jersey, you can stroll two blocks south or one block west, and there, under a power line hung with sneakers, or here, next to a giant stuffed tiger tied to a telephone pole, you can most definitely buy dope and maybe powdere
The Inventor of the High Five
The high five is ubiquitous. It’s a gesture that permeates every social environment -- the workplace, the bar, the middle school kickball field -- and it seems to be appropriate in almost any situation. Your friend got married? High five. You chugged an entire liter of IPA? High five.
30 for 30 Shorts: ‘The High Five’
Our latest film, from award-winning director Michael Jacobs, tells the story of a celebratory gesture and the tumultuous life of the man who made it happen Welcome back to our 30 for 30 documentary short series.
Escape from Cuba: Yasiel Puig’s Untold Journey to the Dodgers
In a no-tell motel on Isla Mujeres, eight miles off the coast of Cancún, Yasiel Puig’s escape had come to a halt. Confined to a corner room at the end of a shabby horseshoe-shaped courtyard, he could only wait and hope, for his value to be appraised, his freedom to be bought.
Mile High Baseball
Spencer Hall decided to go to a baseball game in one of two states where marijuana is legal. He used marijuana before and during the game. He took notes, and later tried to remember what they meant. Note No. 1
The Mystery of the Vanishing Screwball
Hector Santiago of the Los Angeles Angels was sitting at a restaurant table in Glendale, Ariz., in March, holding an orange in his left hand. He formed a circle with his thumb and forefinger, then spread his remaining fingers around the fruit with half an inch between each one.
The Feel Of Nothing: A Life In America's Batting Cages
Steve Salerno’s essays and memoirs have appeared in Harper’s, the New York Times Magazine, Esquire and many other top publications. His 2005 book, SHAM, was a groundbreaking deconstruction of the self-help movement, and he is working on a similar book about medicine.
The Consigliere Commissioner
How incoming MLB commissioner Rob Manfred has quietly accumulated and wielded power for his office, from the 1994 strike to the 2013 Alex Rodriguez PED case If Major League Baseball were the Genco Pura Olive Oil Company, then Robert D. Manfred Jr.
Up Close on Baseball’s Borders
Steve Rushin of Sports Illustrated has called the line running through Connecticut that separates Yankee fans and Red Sox fans the Munson-Nixon line. Mr.
Tony Gwynn’s 2 Hitting Secrets: Work and More Work
Tony Gwynn may have embodied the game of baseball better than anyone else who has played. It was not because Gwynn, who died of cancer on Monday at age 54, was among its greatest hitters. It was because of the wonder he found in the game and the joy he took in applying his daily discoveries.
Vanguard after the Revolution
LAWRENCE, Kan. — Here is Bill James on one of his favorite words and causes: “Bullshit.”
Madison Bumgarner, The Best
I missed Christy Mathewson somehow but caught almost everyone else, down the years—Lefty Grove, Carl Hubbell, Sandy Koufax, Bob Gibson, Jack Morris, Curt Schilling, Randy Johnson—but here was the best.