Vermeer's paintings might be 350 year-old color photographs
I was sitting in the bathtub in 2008 when I thought of a simple way Johannes Vermeer (Girl with a Pearl Earring) might have painted his photorealistic pictures 350 years ago, long before the invention of photography.
Why Banksy Is (Probably) a Woman
Banksy Does New York, a new documentary airing on HBO on Nov. 17, opens on a bunch of scofflaws trying to jack an inflatable word balloon reading "Banksy!" from the side of a low-rise building in Queens. These hooligans weren't Banksy.
Hans Ulrich Obrist, the Curator Who Never Sleeps
Hans Ulrich Obrist is a curator at the Serpentine, a gallery in London’s Kensington Gardens that was once a teahouse and is now firmly established as a center for contemporary art.
The Cult of Jeff Koons
Jeff Koons: A Retrospective an exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York City, June 27–October 19, 2014; the Centre Pompidou, Paris, November 26, 2014–April 27, 2015; and the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, June 5–September 27, 2015 Catal
Ways of Seeing Instagram
Richard Prince is making art by recycling Instagram screenshots. Dealers are hawking art via Instagram. The Met has even retained an Instagram guru “to play catch-up to figure out how best to exploit this online pictorial medium."
Sacred art
The loveliest image I know is Fra Angelico’s ‘Entry of the Blessed into Paradise’, a scene from his painting The Last Judgment of 1431. In it, the blessed, just risen from their graves, gather together in a flowering garden to join hands with angels and dance into the light of heaven.
Liberals Are Killing Art How the Left became obsessed with ideology over beauty
Do more and more liberals find the emotions unleashed by the arts—I mean all of the arts, from poetry to painting to dance—something of an embarrassment? Are the liberal-spirited people who support a rational public policy—a social safety net, consistency and efficiency in foreign affairs, st
Jeff Koons Is Back!
Getting a massive retrospective this month at the Whitney, preparing to install his balloon sculptures at the Louvre, lecturing at the
On Elite Campuses, an Arts Race
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Closed for six years, the Harvard Art Museums reopen here Sunday after a radical overhaul by the architect Renzo Piano. He saved only the shell of the chaste, red-brick Fogg Museum and its interior courtyard, extending it upward in sheets of glass and elegant trusswork.
The 350,000 Percent Rise of Christopher Wool's Masterpiece Painting
Art dealer Christophe Van de Weghe strode into Christie’s auction house in New York with orders from a mystery client. His mission that night, Nov. 12, 2013, was to buy a specific painting—for which the client was willing to pay an astonishingly high price.
Recreating Adam, From Hundreds of Fragments, After the Fall
It happened at 6 on a Sunday night. Adam — a strapping, 6-foot-3-inch marble sculpture by the Venetian Renaissance master Tullio Lombardo — fell to the ground on a patio at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, smashing into hundreds of pieces.
Nick Paumgarten : The Man Who Sold the Art World
Very important people line up differently from you and me. They don’t want to stand behind anyone else, or to acknowledge wanting something that can’t immediately be had.
When A Machine Learning Algorithm Studied Fine Art Paintings, It Saw Things Art Historians Had Never Noticed
The task of classifying pieces of fine art is hugely complex. When examining a painting, an art expert can usually determine its style, its genre, the artist and the period to which it belongs.
The dark, vibrant art of Raccoon Nook
That combined passion for art and technology has led to Nook's distinct artistic style, which works equally as well for illustrating punk robots as it does for ads for big companies. Growing up, Nook's father was both an artist and a developer, which led Nook into the world of computer-based art.
Games, stay away from art. Please
Games and art. Art and games. Do you feel your eyes rolling involuntarily to the back of your head? In the insider world of designers, critics and gamers we have long grown weary of this particular debate. But outside our closed circles, people still find it a surprisingly intriguing question.
The big-eyed children: the extraordinary story of an epic art fraud
There’s a sweet, small suburban house in the vineyards of Napa, northern California. Inside, a family of devout Jehovah’s Witnesses bustles around, offering me a cheese plate. A Siamese cat weaves in and out of my legs. Everything is lovely.
Vernacular Criticism
The most interesting place to read about museums is Yelp. “Boyfriend says that it’s a little silly to review a museum like PS1 because it has so many rotating pieces/exhibitions,” writes Yelp user Saskia S. in her five-star review of MoMA PS1, a contemporary art center in Queens.
Nightmare at the Picasso Museum
On 30 June 1972 Pablo Picasso created his last self-portrait. He had depicted himself many times before, but never like this. His face looked like a skull with stubble. Its colour was greenish-grey. The mouth was a straight slit.
The Met and Other Museums Adapt to the Digital Age
For the Metropolitan Museum of Art, a turning point came in 2011. Down went the signs imploring visitors to stow their cellphones. The Met revamped its website, tailoring it for viewing on smartphone screens.
The arts electric
Do you ever stop to imagine what your great grandchildren will consider to be the defining cultural output of the early 21st century? It is unlikely to be to what we might think.
The Mark of a Masterpiece
Every few weeks, photographs of old paintings arrive at Martin Kemp’s eighteenth-century house, outside Oxford, England. Many of the art works are so decayed that their once luminous colors have become washed out, their shiny coats of varnish darkened by grime and riddled with spidery cracks.