Thirteen Ways of Looking at Greg Maddux
The joke, said Braves broadcaster Skip Caray, is that if half the people who claimed to be at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium during the Bad Times (1985 to 1990) had actually been there, no seat would've been available.
Billy Beane’s Ascendant A’s Are Playing a Brand-New Brand of Moneyball
The funniest thing about the legacy of Moneyball, the 2003 Michael Lewis book and the 2011 Brad Pitt movie, is that it quickly became an ongoing leadership seminar about losers.
The Undefeated Champions of Defeat City
When you leave the baseball fields at Pyne Poynt Park in Camden, New Jersey, you can stroll two blocks south or one block west, and there, under a power line hung with sneakers, or here, next to a giant stuffed tiger tied to a telephone pole, you can most definitely buy dope and maybe powdere
The Inventor of the High Five
The high five is ubiquitous. It’s a gesture that permeates every social environment -- the workplace, the bar, the middle school kickball field -- and it seems to be appropriate in almost any situation. Your friend got married? High five. You chugged an entire liter of IPA? High five.
30 for 30 Shorts: ‘The High Five’
Our latest film, from award-winning director Michael Jacobs, tells the story of a celebratory gesture and the tumultuous life of the man who made it happen Welcome back to our 30 for 30 documentary short series.
Escape from Cuba: Yasiel Puig’s Untold Journey to the Dodgers
In a no-tell motel on Isla Mujeres, eight miles off the coast of Cancún, Yasiel Puig’s escape had come to a halt. Confined to a corner room at the end of a shabby horseshoe-shaped courtyard, he could only wait and hope, for his value to be appraised, his freedom to be bought.
Mile High Baseball
Spencer Hall decided to go to a baseball game in one of two states where marijuana is legal. He used marijuana before and during the game. He took notes, and later tried to remember what they meant. Note No. 1
The Mystery of the Vanishing Screwball
Hector Santiago of the Los Angeles Angels was sitting at a restaurant table in Glendale, Ariz., in March, holding an orange in his left hand. He formed a circle with his thumb and forefinger, then spread his remaining fingers around the fruit with half an inch between each one.
The Feel Of Nothing: A Life In America's Batting Cages
Steve Salerno’s essays and memoirs have appeared in Harper’s, the New York Times Magazine, Esquire and many other top publications. His 2005 book, SHAM, was a groundbreaking deconstruction of the self-help movement, and he is working on a similar book about medicine.
The Consigliere Commissioner
How incoming MLB commissioner Rob Manfred has quietly accumulated and wielded power for his office, from the 1994 strike to the 2013 Alex Rodriguez PED case If Major League Baseball were the Genco Pura Olive Oil Company, then Robert D. Manfred Jr.
Up Close on Baseball’s Borders
Steve Rushin of Sports Illustrated has called the line running through Connecticut that separates Yankee fans and Red Sox fans the Munson-Nixon line. Mr.
Tony Gwynn’s 2 Hitting Secrets: Work and More Work
Tony Gwynn may have embodied the game of baseball better than anyone else who has played. It was not because Gwynn, who died of cancer on Monday at age 54, was among its greatest hitters. It was because of the wonder he found in the game and the joy he took in applying his daily discoveries.
Vanguard after the Revolution
LAWRENCE, Kan. — Here is Bill James on one of his favorite words and causes: “Bullshit.”
Madison Bumgarner, The Best
I missed Christy Mathewson somehow but caught almost everyone else, down the years—Lefty Grove, Carl Hubbell, Sandy Koufax, Bob Gibson, Jack Morris, Curt Schilling, Randy Johnson—but here was the best.
Lionel Messi Is Impossible
In their Group F World Cup match late last month, Argentina and Iran were still deadlocked after 90 minutes.
Silence in the favela
As part of its cleanup for the World Cup, in 2008 the Brazilian government began a police crackdown to sweep criminals out of the urban slums known as "favelas.
Portrait Of A Serial Winner
BEFORE GETTING TO the alleged mob hit or the mystery of the missing referee, there should be an explanation about how this quest began. An assigned profile of Luis Suarez led to a stack of things to read about his past.
How Jurgen Klinsmann Plans to Make U.S. Soccer Better (and Less American)
Even before he exiled the most accomplished and iconic player in United States soccer history and before his presumptive top goal scorer went nearly an entire season without scoring goals and before h
Mr. Ten Percent: The Man Who Built — And Bilked — American Soccer
In the middle of 1989, suburban soccer dad Chuck Blazer had just lost his job, had no income, and was struggling with debt.
Why Americans Call Soccer 'Soccer'
The British started it. New Zealand's largest newspaper is deeply conflicted. With the World Cup underway in Brazil, should The New Zealand Herald refer to the "global round-ball game" as "soccer" or "football"? The question has been put to readers, and the readers have spoken.
The Burden of Being Messi
In much of Argentina, where Lionel Messi lived until he was 13, native speakers replace the “y” sound with a “sh” sound. Yo, the personal pronoun for “I,” becomes “sho,” and calle, which other Spanish speakers would pronounce “ka-yay,” becomes “ka-shey.
America’s Most Wanted
How DeAndre Yedlin went from being the player with a 1 percent chance of making the USMNT’s final cut to one of the breakout performers in the 2014 World Cup The email arrived on a Monday morning in May. DeAndre Yedlin was not yet a star.
How important are substitutions in football?
Jonathan Liew investigates: Are managers who don't use all their substitutions, or who use them too late, giving up a significant advantage as a result? Sometimes you change something, and it goes wrong.
How computer analysts took over at Britain's top football clubs
Why has David Moyes had such a horror show since taking over as Manchester United manager last summer? From our armchairs, the diagnosis has been relatively straightforward: taking over from a legend is inevitably a fool's errand; anyone replacing Sir Alex Ferguson was doomed before a ball was kick
Van Gaalogy 101
You know what it takes to manage Manchester United? It takes brass balls to manage Manchester United. The first time Louis van Gaal pulled his pants down in front of his players happened in — but hang on; let’s walk that back a second.
Diamonds in the Rough
The human body is 18 percent carbon, which means that if you subject it to high enough pressures at high enough temperatures and hold it there for a long enough time, it will form diamonds. You can try this yourself, in a laboratory.
Deconstructing the Perfect Burger
How to make a great hamburger is a question that has bedeviled the nation for generations, for as long as Americans have had griddles and broilers, for as long as summertime shorts-wearing cooks have gone into the yard to grill.
How to Make Pizza: A Recipe from Roberta's Pizza
There is pizza dough in my refrigerator right now. I made it last night in about 20 minutes, 15 of which were spent reading a magazine while it rested.
The Essential Techniques That Every Home Cook Should Know
Inspired by conversations on the Food52 Hotline, we're sharing tips and tricks that make navigating all of our kitchens easier and more fun. Today: We're going back to basics with the essential cooking techniques -- think of this as Cooking 101.
The Master Ice Cream Recipe
1. In a small pot, simmer cream, milk, sugar and salt until sugar completely dissolves, about 5 minutes. Remove pot from heat. In a separate bowl, whisk yolks.
Thanksgiving Recipes Across the United States
Lucy Buffett’s Oyster Dressing 12 tablespoons/1 1/2 sticks unsalted butter, divided, plus more for baking dish 1 (8-inch-square) baked and cooled cornbread, pref
The Science Behind Baking the Most Delicious Cookie Ever
This post originally appeared on Ozy.com. You like soft and chewy. He likes thin and crispy. If only there were a chocolate chip cookie recipe that pleased everyone…
chicken phở
Last week, when the polar vortex, something that ought to be a frozen rum cocktail with an umbrella on top, but is sadly anything but, had begun to descend its icy grasp on all parts of the U.S., I made the best pot of soup of my life.
7 Sauces That Taste Better Homemade
Two weeks ago I provided nine nonbeef burger recipes. Consider these recipes an addendum: homemade alternatives to the bottled and jarred condiments that are lined up like summer’s foot soldiers on our refrigerator doors.
chocolate peanut butter cheesecake
This birthday cake was assigned to the side of the family whose dessert preferences can be roughly summarized as chocolate + anything else, but if that “else” were cheesecake, coffee, peanut butter or raspberries, all the better, thank you very much.
Cast Iron Cooking: The Easy Pull-Apart Pepperoni Garlic Knots That Will Forever Change How You Entertain
These super-simple pull-apart pepperoni garlic knots will kick your next party in the pants with flavor. [Photographs: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]
broccoli, cheddar and wild rice casserole
Although my parents claim to have loved us, there were all sorts of delicious foods that my sister and I knew our friends got to eat in their homes that we were denied in our own, glorious meal-like substances such as shake-and-bake chicken, hamburger helpers, sugar cereals with colorful marshmall
Recipe: Slow Cooker Chicken Tikka Masala
I didn't think chicken tikka masala could really get much better, but then I remembered my fall-time best friend: the slow cooker. This is a curry dish that benefits from a nice, long simmer anyway, so why not let that happen while I'm off doing other things? That's what I call smart cooking.
warm lentil and potato salad
You don’t have to look at me like that. I know, I know how you and most people feel about lentils. About how they’re mealy and brown and generally lackluster, like health food putty; about how you’ll eat them, sure, but only if you must.
The Best Chocolate Chip Cookies
Chewy chocolate chip cookies with crisp edges, a rich, buttery, toffee-like flavor, big chocolate chunks, and a sprinkle of sea salt. Note: For best results, ingredients should be measured by weight, not volume.
Secrets of the Creative Brain
As a psychiatrist and neuroscientist who studies creativity, I’ve had the pleasure of working with many gifted and high-profile subjects over the years, but Kurt Vonnegut—dear, funny, eccentric, lovable, tormented Kurt Vonnegut—will always be one of my favorites.
What if Age Is Nothing but a Mind-Set?
One day in the fall of 1981, eight men in their 70s stepped out of a van in front of a converted monastery in New Hampshire. They shuffled forward, a few of them arthritically stooped, a couple with canes. Then they passed through the door and entered a time warp.
This Is Your Brain on Silence
One icy night in March 2010, 100 marketing experts piled into the Sea Horse Restaurant in Helsinki, with the modest goal of making a remote and medium-sized country a world-famous tourist destination.
We Are All Confident Idiots
The trouble with ignorance is that it feels so much like expertise. A leading researcher on the psychology of human wrongness sets us straight.
Why We Procrastinate
The British philosopher Derek Parfit espoused a severely reductionist view of personal identity in his seminal book, Reasons and Persons: It does not exist, at least not in the way we usually consider it.
Learning How to Exert Self-Control
PARIS — NOT many Ivy League professors are associated with a type of candy. But Walter Mischel, a professor of psychology at Columbia, doesn’t mind being one of them. I’m with Mr. Mischel (pronounced me-SHELL) in his tiny home office in Paris, where he spends the summer with his girlfriend.
The slow death of purposeless walking
A number of recent books have lauded the connection between walking - just for its own sake - and thinking. But are people losing their love of the purposeless walk? Walking is a luxury in the West. Very few people, particularly in cities, are obliged to do much of it at all.
Buy Experiences, Not Things
Live in anticipation, gathering stories and memories. New research builds on the vogue mantra of behavioral economics. Forty-seven percent of the time, the average mind is wandering.

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